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A Bad Case of False Pride

Narcissistic Personality Disorder Equals a Bad Case of False Pride

Have you ever done something that you were so scared and ashamed of that you decided to lie and blame someone else?

As a child, maybe you broke something of your mothers that was precious to her, failed to finish an assignment on time or seriously neglected your chores?

After lying and blaming someone else to get out of trouble, you may have said something to yourself such as . . .

“They wouldn’t have believed the truth if I told them”

or

“She is such a b—h, she deserved to take the blame!”

or

“Life is so unfair, how is anyone expected to play by the rules anyway?”

If this situation worked out okay for you, chances are you might have used this strategy until you found yourself with a bad case of false pride.
Symptoms of this can include . . .

  • A general sense of guilt and shame that you experience most of the time.
  • 
Needing to see yourself as a victim (and feel sorry for yourself) to deal with these feelings.
  • 
Compensate by puffing yourself up and believing that the rules for everyone else don’t apply to you (because you find you are now breaking them all the time).

A child with good parents may get help at some point finding their way out of this trap, but if this behaviour becomes a habit, the person may end up with a narcissistic personality.

This is called a disordered personality, because for a person to become comfortable with justifying their own lies and ignoring their own conscience, they must distort and disorder their own sense of reality. One example, being that they start convincing themselves that their lies are the truth.

Not a good place to be. For starters, the personal stress and anxiety are terrible. In the end, you cannot fool everyone all the time and so whatever you do manage to build in your life, is likely to come crashing down on you along with your false pride. This will come in the form of a nervous breakdown, which is not how most of us would prefer our ambitions to end.

A fast way out of false pride? Do the hard thing and admit your own mistakes.

For more details check out my latest short picture book, Your BlindSpot, by clicking the image below.

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